Showing posts with label #middle grade. Show all posts
Showing posts with label #middle grade. Show all posts

Saturday, November 5, 2016

Preorder for New Pen-L Publishing Books

Pen-L Publishing offers two new books to be released soon. I love to introduce since I like finding new books available.  Those of you that follow. Watch each month near the beginning. I do like Pen-L Publishing 
 
 
 

The River of Cattle

The Will & Buck Series: Book One
For Readers 8 - 12 | Grades 3 - 7

by Alice V. Brock


WillBuck_FrontLo.jpg
 
Will Whitaker’s eleventh summer is one thrill after another.
A cattle drive with a famous Texas Ranger, a Comanche trying to steal his horse, a buffalo stampede, thirst-maddened cattle crossing eighty miles of alkali desert to a dangerous ford on the Pecos River—it’s almost more than Will can endure. He gets to work as a drover, riding his best friend Buck, a big buckskin stallion, until he is captured by a vicious Comanche war chief. And only his worst enemy can rescue him.
      Two Feathers—half white, half Comanche—runs away from his tribe when he learns his uncle killed his white father. He sees Will’s horse and knows he is destined to have him, this great warrior’s horse. Camping alone and following the winding River of Cattle across the High Plains of West Texas, he tries again and again to take him. Will foils him every time, but Two Feathers comes too close and is captured by the drovers.
      The two boys, both fighting the grief of their mother’s deaths, both without a true home, face death and danger separately, but eventually they must learn acceptance of each other’s differences or their mutual mistrust could lead them to disaster on the brutal Texas-New Mexico frontier.
Will they become brothers or mortal enemies?

Praise for The River of Cattle
“A compelling and triumphant introduction to the colorful bygone era of cattle drives. Alice Brock entertainingly weaves fact and fiction into a dual tale of high drama, where diversity and friendship must meet head-on to determine who survives.”
Tim Lewis, Director of the Writing Academy at West Texas A&M University, author of Forever Friday
“Two boys, one a drover on a cattle drive, and one a Comanche runaway, tackle wilderness adventures in The River of Cattle. Each is mourning the loss of his mother. Will rides his handsome buckskin stallion named Buck. Two Feathers rides Old Pony and camps alone to prove he is a fierce warrior.
      “When Two Feathers decides Buck should belong to him, the two boys wrestle and wrangle. But with Yellow Hawk chasing Two Feathers, cowboy and Comanche join together to survive the pursuit and try to figure out each other’s lifestyle.
      “A rough riding tale in true Wild West fashion, The River of Cattle puts the reader in a saddle and gallops away with him!”
— Doris Fisher, author of Army Camels, Jackson Sundown, and Odd Day, Even Day, Half Day


Alice V. Brock learned to love Western books as a child when her father brought home a Louis L’Amour paperback Western and she fell in love with the cowboys galloping through those pages. Mr. L’Amour’s books, and TV shows like Gunsmoke, Rawhide, and Bonanza of the late ‘50s and ‘60s brought the West alive to her. The history of Texas and the Old West is full of real stories of those times. Her wish is to bring them alive for kids of today. The Old West has not disappeared, and Alice brings real people in the history of Texas and the Old West to her writing. Real people who lived in history and have descendants who live today.
      Her chance to see cowboys in action came when she married and moved to her husband’s family ranch in Iola, Texas, where she watches the grazing cattle from her kitchen window. Her grandchildren are the fifth generation to live on the Brock Ranch.
      To learn more about Alice V. Brock and her writing, visit her website at www.AliceVBrock.com. Watch for announcements about the next book in the Will and Buck series, Murder on the Pecos.
 
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Coming November 22! Pre-order now!
 
Death and Donuts

– A Frankie and Josh Mystery –

by Stan Schatt

Death&Donuts_Front_SM.jpg
 
Hollywood stars! Politicians! Betrayal! Murder!
And a by-the-book cop just trying to do her job in the middle of it all.
To solve the murder of a movie star just weeks before the Academy Awards, Detective Frankie Ryan has to navigate through a web of Hollywood secrets and political landmines, not to mention the “old boys club” in her own police department. The presence of a new designer drug and the deaths it is tallying up threaten to hinder her investigation and leave her without a suspect—and maybe out of a job. Even with the aid of psychic reporter Josh Harrell, there is more confusion around every corner. Trusted friends will turn on her, leaving her unsure who to believe and who might be in on the murder and conspiracy.
Can Frankie discover the killer before it is too late?
 


Stan Schatt, author of over thirty-five books, is a futurist, technologist, novelist, and a person curious about many things. His writing takes advantage of his many occupations ranging from autopsy assistant, telecommunications professor, and police department administrator to research director, literature professor and network manager. Schatt’s novels range from paranormal mysteries and science fiction adventures to young adult mysteries. His non-fiction includes books on technology as well as guides to Kurt Vonnegut and Michael Connelly. http://stanschatt.com/
 
Watch for those two now. I loved the sound of a middle grader. I've never read the below mystery. I may have to try that one. Do you have any questions or comments?
 
 

Saturday, July 23, 2016

An Interview of a Character in Penny Ehrenkranz's New Book

Welcome, fellow "ghost" writer, Penny Ehrenkranz to Writing with God's Hope blog. However, today, I won't be interviewing Penny. We wish to talk with the main character in her new book, Wendy Wiles.
                   

 

Wendy, tell us a little about yourself and your family.

 

I was born in Portland, Oregon in 1983.  When I was eleven, my mom and dad separated for a while and we had to move to a small town thirty miles outside Portland.  I was bummed since I had to leave all my friends behind.

 

My dad stayed in Portland, so my older brother Mike and I lived with our Mom.  Mom’s a writer, but she wasn’t selling too much.  My brother is a pain. He teases me a lot, but we eventually become close. My mom likes to say, “Wendy, darling,” when she talks to me and that drives me crazy.  I’m not some Peter Pan character.

 

I like to write and read poetry, so that makes me a little weird I guess.

 

What was it like moving from a big city to a rural community?  Was it hard to make new friends?

 

I hated moving at first, but because I met Jennifer, it wasn’t long before I felt good about it.  Mom used say in the city Mike and I were little fish in a big pond, but in Scappoose we were big fish in a little pond.  We were able to play sports and do things we might not have been able to do in the city where there were lots of kids wanting to do those things.  Jennifer had a lot of friends and she introduced me to them, but she and I were best friends.

 

What is your new hometown and school like?

 

Scappoose is where I go to school. I actually live in Warren, which isn’t really a town. Scappoose only has about 6,500 people.  There aren’t very many stores and the library is so tiny, not like the one in Portland.  St. Helens is the next town over. It’s the county seat and has over 12,000 people, and it has a few more places to shop, so Mom goes there more often to get stuff for us. 

 

Our school is small, too.  There are only four classes for each grade. Jennifer is a grade behind me in school, but we still see each other at lunch and recess times.  Mike goes to the middle school, which is right next door to Petersen School where I go.  It’s different from Portland, but I like it. The teachers are really nice.

 

When did you first realize your home was haunted?

 

The day we moved in and I met Jennifer, she told us a story about her brother and some friends spending the night in our house when it was empty. She said they heard a piano playing but no one was there.  While she was telling us the story, a windstorm blew through the porch where we were hiding from the rain.  All of a sudden the leaves looked like two people dancing and we heard this weird music.   Then later in the house, I started seeing things.  Crazy, huh?

 

What did you think when you learned your friend’s family restaurant was also haunted?

 

This was much later after we figured out what was going on at our house.  Jennifer and her family moved to California, and Mike and I met the new folks who moved in down the road from us.  They have a son, Jon. His family had read about our ghost hunting, and his mom was really interested.  She’s the one who told me they heard the building they bought for their new restaurant was also haunted.  It freaked me out at first because I was pretty well done with ghosts by this time. Once we started helping out getting the restaurant ready to open, Mike, Jon, and I all got curious and started digging for clues to see what was going on.

 

Were you scared when you found out you could see and communicate with ghosts?

 

You bet I was!  I’d get goose bumps whenever they came around or I saw them.  I didn’t know what to expect. I eventually figured out they wouldn’t hurt me, but they still scared me when they’d show up. They just wanted someone to know what had happened to them and why they died.

 

How did you and your friends solve the mystery of the ghosts?

 

We actually had a lot of help from the ghosts themselves.  We used the library to look up stuff and followed clues the ghosts left for us.

 

What do you like to do when you’re not chasing ghosts?

 

I love to read and write poetry.  I even had one of my poems published in a magazine.  Even though my brother teases me, we play together and with our friends.  We like being outside.  There’s always something to do when you live in the country, like riding our bikes and swimming.

 

Wendy, thanks for stopping by to visit with us.

 

Now, Penny, you tell us your point of view about Wendy's story.

   
Wendy Wiles attracts ghosts, first in Ghost for Rent, when her parents separate and she, her brother, and mother move into a haunted house. The story begins in Portland, Oregon and quickly moves to small town, Scappoose, Oregon. Miserable at leaving her friends and beloved Portland behind, Wendy meets her neighbor Jennifer who tells her the house Wendy’s mom rented is haunted. After two of them appear to Wendy, the girls find themselves tracking down the mystery of who the ghosts are and why they "live" in the Wiles' home.
 
In Ghost for Lunch, Wendy’s friend, Jennifer, moves away, leaving Wendy sad until new neighbors and their restaurant in St. Helens bring ghosts back into Wendy's life. She, her brother, and their new friend discover the two cases are connected. Once again, the young sleuths use clues and lots of brainstorming to figure out who is haunting the restaurant.
 
While on the surface, these two stories appear to be about ghosts and the mystery of solving them, they are also about the importance of family and friends and working together to solve a problem.
 
        Ghostly Visions is available direct from the publisher 4RV Publishing LLC for $15.99 including shipping and handling: http://www.4rvpublishingcatalog.com/penny-lockwood.php.  It can also be ordered from your local bookstore with the following ISBN numbers: ISBN-10: 0982642326, ISBN-13: 978-0982642320, or through Amazon, https://www.amazon.com/Ghostly-Visions-Ghost-Rent-Lunch/dp/0982642326/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1465600196&sr=1-1&keywords=ghostly+visions.
 
Penny Lockwood (Ehrenkranz) has published over 100 articles, 75 stories, a chapbook, and her stories have been included in two anthologies. She writes for both adults and children. Her fiction has appeared in numerous genres and children’s publications, and non‑fiction work has appeared in a variety of writing, parenting, and young adult print magazines and on line publications.  She is a former editor for MuseItUp Publishing, 4RV Publishing, and Damnation Books.  Visit her web site at http:// pennylockwoodehrenkranz.yolasite.com and her writing blog at http://pennylockwoodehrenkranz.blogspot.com/.
 
4RV Publishing has joined her two middle grade novels (Ghost for Rent and Ghost for Lunch) as Ghostly Visions. She recently released Boo’s Bad Day with 4RV Publishing and has one other children’s picture book under contract with them: Many Colored Coats. She has three romances published by MuseItUp Publishing: Love Delivery, Lady in Waiting, and Mirror, Mirror. Her short story collection, A Past and A Future, is available through Alban Lake Publishing and Smashwords.
 
Oh, Penny, I'm so glad the two books are available for purchase now. They sound wonderful. I need to get mine.
 
Does anyone have questions for Penny or Wendy?
 
 


Saturday, December 20, 2014

An Interview with Author, Bonnie Lanthripe

I met Bonnie Lanthripe in Edmond, Oklahoma when she stopped by the university where I was doing a booksigning. She purchased my Divine Dining  and Victoria and the Ghost. How could an author like me not like someone like that? She became a cherished friend and one of my sweetest encouragers.

Since then, Pen-L Publishing Co. has released Bonnie's debut novel, and it's very good. I'm not just saying that because she's my friend, but because I have a twelve-year-old grandson that the hero of her middle grade book  The Ringleader reminds me of.

 
 


A middle-grade adventure novel. Fourteen year-old Patrick Morrison makes a bizarre unexplainable discovery while exploring a drainage culvert with his friends. Obsessed with identifying what it is and how it got there, his search turns up some surprising clues as they race from one adventure to another. A series of unusual twists uncovers all the pieces of the puzzle, bringing a stunning resolution to the riddle.


 
 
I asked Bonnie to stop by Writing with God's Hope blog today and answer some questions.
 
 
1.  Bonnie, tell us a little about yourself.
      I am originally from Arkansas, lived many years in California where I met my husband and raised our family. We have four children, six grandchildren and two great-grandbabies. I love spending time and traveling with them all.

2.  Tell us about your writing journey.
      I basically have been writing for as long as I can remember--- just not on paper. I grew up on a farm in Arkansas and when I was alone, in the field, in the barn loft, I made up stories, even supplying the dialogue and sound effects. I wrote very detailed letters to my friends back home when my family traveled during my teens.
        It wasn't until after our youngest child was in college that I got an opportunity to go back to school to finish my degree. When I began creative writing classes, I felt as if God had presented me with a huge gift; a great big box tied up with a red ribbon; something I'd always wanted, but didn't know it. I've been writing ever since, but it was only two years ago when I got up the nerve to attempt to get published. What a thrill when I held my book in my hand!

3.  Did you ever feel like giving up? And how did you press through this?
     I let life get in my way. It is sometimes difficult for me to discipline myself to a steady routine.  Busy-ness of everyday life sometime overwhelm me and I think maybe it would be better to just stop. Then I remember that God gave me this awesome gift and I plow through the daily "stuff" and come back to the keyboard.

4.  What gave you the idea for this book? What is the book about?
      My 14 year-old grandson told me about an experience he and his friends had. I thought it was hilarious the way he told it, and that it would make a great story.
      The book is about Patrick Morrison and his friends who like to adventure. Instead of hanging around inside, they  get out and explore their neighborhood, the nearby open fields, the surrounding community. Check things out.  They make up wild stories and shoot videos of them.
     One day, while exploring a drainage culvert, Patrick sees something he can't explain, something that really spooks him, but he is determined to find out what it is and how it got into the culvert. His search for the answer leads the boys into some sometimes humorous, sometimes risky, situations but their adventure ends in solving the mystery.

5.  How do you feel this book will encourage people in their walk with Christ, or did you have something in mind when you wrote it?
     "The Ringleader" is not classified a Christian novel, however, when I first began writing courses, I made a commitment to write responsibly. My purpose is to present characters who are respectful, responsible, with integrity. They accept accountability for their actions and learn valuable lessons through their experiences. Isn't that how a Christian is supposed to act?

6.  Anything  more you'd like to add?
      Maybe that I never thought about writing a book for middle-grade or Young Adult. Only when I began writing this one did I realize how fun I was having. I'm having the same good time with the sequel.

7.  What's a little known fact about you?
      I am a socially functioning introvert. Go figure that one out.

 Oh, I love that, Bonnie. I think that describes me, too. Must be why we like each other.  
 
8. Where can your readers find you?
       Bonnie.Lanthripe.com/  From here readers can connect to my author's page, blog and web page.
       Also, Pen-L Publishing, Amazon.com, Kindle, Barnes and Noble and wherever books are sold.


 
 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Interview with MG Author, Mary Hamilton

My special guest is middle-grade author, Mary Hamilton. When I met Mary at ACFW conference in 2012, I fell in love with her sweet spirit. I read her debut novel, and that made me hungry to read the second in the series. She has the voice and heart of the preteen/early teen. In Speak No Evil her characters are a couple years older.

    If you ever went to summer church camp, you will relive those years in her Rustic Knoll Bible Camp series, both the good and the bad.

     If you have a middle-grade student on your Christmas list, this is a must-buy for a stocking stuffer.

     So, now I have some questions for Mary, so that you might meet her, too, and learn about her new book, Speak No Evil.



1. When was the last time you wanted to give up on writing? What saved you from doing that?

I’ve wanted to give up many times in the last few months as I’ve worked on the last book in my Rustic Knoll Bible Camp series. It was a difficult story that I struggled with all the way through. The only reason I didn’t quit was because I had a contract to honor.

 

 2. Ah, yes, those pesky contracts that we both love and hate. Where did you get the idea of your new book?

When Hear No Evil, the first book in the series came out, I received many comments that the bully in the story was very relevant to today’s youth. So I decided to make him the star of the second book. I wanted to figure out what made him tick, why he acted the way he did.

  

3. Who is your favorite character from your new book?

I’ve developed a great fondness for Taylor, the main character. When I first started writing his story, I didn’t particularly like him. He was, after all, a bully. But the more I wrote and got to know what was in his heart and the hurt he was hiding, the more I came to love him. He reminds me of a couple people I know who are rough around the edges and kind of prickly at times, but inside they have a good heart.

 


4. If you could be a song, what would it be?

I would like to be any one of the great hymns, because they are enduring, meaningful, and their whole purpose is to praise our God.

 


5. In what place do you do most of your writing?

If I’m working on a first draft, I’m usually closeted in one of our upstairs bedrooms away from telephones and noise and our attention-loving Golden Retriever. If I’m rewriting, I’m either at the kitchen table or out on the patio (with the dog!).

 

 
6. What book are you reading right now?

I just finished Red Zone by Kelli Hughett. It’s a romantic suspense played out on the edges of professional football. I highly recommend it.

 


7. How did you connect with your current publisher?

I met Lynellen Perry of HopeSprings books at the Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writers Conference. We sat across the table from each other at breakfast the last morning, when I’d pretty much given up on getting my first book published. Obviously, God had a different idea!

 
What a wonderful inspiring story for other still unpublished authors who are getting discouraged.
 


    

Mary L. Hamilton grew up at a youth camp in southern Wisconsin, much like the setting for her Rustic Knoll Bible Camp series. While raising her own three children, she was active in her church’s youth ministry, hosting small group Bible studies and pancake suppers. One summer, she even volunteered as a camp counselor for a week—and decided once was enough.

When not writing, Mary enjoys knitting, reading and being outdoors. She and her husband make their home in Texas with a rescued Golden Retriever.

 

Connect with Mary:




Twitter:@mhamilton122

 

Having his younger sister at camp was a pain, but Taylor Dixon never expected the pain to go so deep.

At 15, Taylor dreams of getting his driver’s license and driving racecars when he’s older. Only his younger sister, Marissa, believes in his dreams, but her adventurous spirit keeps landing him in trouble. Dad won’t let Taylor get his license unless he stays out of trouble, and predicts he’s heading for the same jail cell as his once-favored older brother.

Taylor returns to Rustic Knoll Bible Camp, expecting softball, swimming and sermons. Then he discovers a classic Mustang in the camp’s machine shed, and the owner’s invitation to help restore it fuels his dream of driving race cars. But when Marissa falls for his snobbish cabin mate, the ensuing war of words and pranks escalates until it threatens to destroy both the car and his dreams for the future.

Will Taylor fulfill Dad’s prediction? Or will the message of the old Mustang’s engine set him free from the prison he built himself?

 


 


 
I love the cover, Mary. Of course, I love Mustangs. The book is good.

Do any of you have questions or comments for Mary?
 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Penny Ehrenkranz's Ghost Stories

My guest today is Penny Lockwood Ehrenkranz. I love her children's book, Boo's Bad Day. Naturally, I'm fond of ghost tales, so ...

Since this, after all, is Weird Wednesday, I interviewed Penny about her writing and about her upcoming middle-grade ghost stories. Here's my questions. Perhaps, Writing with God's hope blog followers will have more to ask in the comments section below.
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WATCH BELOW FOR PENNY'S "W...E..I..RD  G...HOST STORIES!!!"
 
Janet, thank you for inviting me to visit your blog today.  It has been a pleasure answering your questions. If people want to learn more about me or my work, my web site is http://pennylockwoodehrenkranz.yolasite.com

 

1.You're sure welcome, Penny. Now, tell us something of your writing journey.

Like most authors, I became interested in writing when I was a child in grade school.  I often entertained myself by writing books, illustrating them, and binding them with cardboard and ribbon.  In high school, my senior English teacher allowed me to work on a novel in lieu of doing homework assignments.  I have no idea what happened to that manuscript. I do remember being influenced by J.D. Salinger at the time.  After high school, I took some writing classes, but I was unable to sell any of my work and gave up for many years.  After my children were born, I did some grant writing for local non-profits.  When I realized I could make money from my writing, I took another writing class and this time, I made my first sale.  I began by writing non-fiction articles and short stories.  My middle grade novels, Ghost for Rent and Ghost for Lunch are the only full-length books I’ve written.  I still prefer to write 10,000 word or less stories.

 

2.       Your journey sounds a lot  like mine. I was inspired by an English teacher, and I started with short stories.   Is there a favorite theme in your writing?


I enjoy writing fantasy and science fiction, but I generally include a touch of romance.  I would say a common theme would be that families and relationships between people are important and should be nurtured.

 

3.                What books have you read recently?

I recently completed Room by Emma Donoghue (my book group selection), and11/22/63 by Stephen King (for pleasure).

 

4.                What other interests do you have besides writing?

I enjoy walking, water aerobics, gardening, spending time with my family and pets, crocheting, and of course, reading.

 

5.                What is your writing routine?

Routine? Hum… I really don’t have one.  I’ve never felt that I needed to write every day to call myself a writer.  If I write, submit, and get a story or article accepted, I feel I’ve accomplished my goal of being a writer.  When I am working on a project, however, I do better in the afternoon and early evening when I tend to feel more creative.  I am a “pantser,” so I don’t outline, although I will keep track of my characters names, descriptions, quirks, etc. I will often see a scene running through my mind as though I’m watching a movie.

 

6.                What song best describes you?

Sorry. I don’t have an answer for this one.  I’m a classic rock kind of gal, but I’m afraid what I would have answered when I was younger doesn’t really fit now.

 

7.                Have you ever felt like giving up? If so, how did you get through it?

Since I don’t feel obligated to write every day, I suppose one could say I give up quite often.  I rather think of it as taking a break to do what needs to be done to care for family, finish up a major task, or take a vacation.  When I get an idea for a new story or article, however, I am refreshed and ready to get started.

 

8.               Interesting way to view it. What’s your favorite quote?

I’m not sure who said it, but my favorite quote is “These things, too, shall pass.”

 

9.               Ah, good one to remember. What’s next for you?

I retired from my day job (office manager for our county district attorney) in 2008 and promptly hired on as an editor for a couple of small publishing houses.  When family obligations became more demanding, I retired again and gave up my editing jobs. Now, as time permits, I’m working on a fantasy, working title Raven’s Story.

 

I am currently under contract for my middle grade novels, Ghost for Rent and Ghost for Lunch as well as a picture book, Many Colored Coats. I am waiting on illustrations for all three of these books and hope to see publication with 4RV Publishing in the next year.

 

10.          How would you answer the question, "do you believe in ghosts?"

I do believe in ghosts.  The first time I saw a ghost was after my dad died when I was a child.  I looked out the window of our house and saw him walking up the street from the bus stop, suitcase in hand, headed home. Of course, he never arrived, but to this day, I can still picture it in my mind.

 

The second ghost I saw was when I was in my 20s. Several of my friends and I had rented a ski lodge in New Hampshire during the off-season.  I was home alone one evening, sitting in the main living room.  The clock struck thirteen (yes thirteen). I looked up and saw an opaque form floating up the stairwell to the second floor. When I ascended the stairs to investigate, no one was there.

 
I don't have cover art for my two ghost stories, yet, but here's what my main characters look like in my mind:

Mike Wiles, age 13

Wendy Miles, age 11
 
 


















Tell us a bit of what the stories are about. I find the titles catchy.

First in the Series
GHOST FOR RENT

      This middle grade, paranormal, ghost story is aimed at youth in grades four to six. It is approximately 16,418 words, 11 chapters, and 61 pages long.

      The story begins when eleven year old Wendy Wiles learns her parents are planning to get divorced.  Forced to leave her beloved city home for a cheaper country place, Wendy, her mother, and her thirteen year old brother move to rural Warren, Oregon.

      On move-in day, Wendy meets a neighbor girl who tells her their quaint country home is haunted.  Events proceed quickly as Wendy, her new friend, Jennifer, and Wendy’s brother, Mike, see ghostly figures dancing in the woods.  Despite Mom’s claims that “there are no such things as ghosts,” paranormal events persist in the Wiles’s home. Meanwhile her brother Mike, arch-tease, continues to torment Wendy, claiming he’s causing the unusual happenings.

      Wendy searches through library records to get to the bottom of the mystery.  Finally with Jennifer’s help, Wendy begins to unravel the truth. At last, even Mike can no longer disbelieve and decides to aid Wendy in her search.  By the end of the story, the three young sleuths have uncovered an accidental death, a suicide and a murder.
 
 
 
 
Second in the Series
GHOST FOR LUNCH
 
            This middle grade, paranormal, ghost story is aimed at youth in grades four to six. It is approximately 30,365 words, 13 chapters, and 110 double spaced pages.
            Wendy Wiles, her brother Mike, and her family have lived in Warren, Oregon for almost a year.  When they moved into their new home, they found it haunted. With the help of a new friend, Jennifer, Wendy and her brother solved the mystery of the haunting in the first book of this series, Ghost for Rent.
            This story begins as Jennifer and her family move to California, leaving Wendy bereft of her best friend with only a new kitten to help remember her.  Shortly after Jennifer leaves, Wendy and Mike meet their new neighbor, a thirteen year old boy, Jon Adams.  Jon is cute, and Wendy is attracted to him, but everything is thrown into turmoil when Wendy learns Jon’s family bought a haunted restaurant in St. Helens.
            Wendy, Mike and Jon soon become good friends.  Jon’s mother is a bit odd.  She loves ghosts and wants to learn more about Wendy’s experience.  She invites Wendy to help clean the haunted restaurant, hoping that Wendy’s presence will make the ghosts more active.
            Wendy agrees as long as Mike is there, too.  As soon as they arrive at the restaurant, Wendy becomes aware of the ghosts.  She sees shadows in the upstairs windows; she hears a young boy calling; she feels blasts of cold air.  Although Mike, Jon and Jon’s family are all there, too, no one else sees or feels anything.  Wendy is frustrated until one of the ghosts attaches himself to Jon’s dad.  It’s impossible to ignore what happens, and Jon and Mike both admit they now believe Wendy.
            The children embark upon a quest to find out who is haunting the restaurant and how Wendy, Jon and Jon’s dad are connected to the ghosts.  The children follow clues they find in old newspapers, a note left in the restaurant’s kitchen, and a ghostly apparition that causes Wendy to have a bicycle accident.
            By the end of the story, the children solve the mystery.  The restaurant is haunted by none other than Steve Milhouse, the husband of the young woman who took her life in Wendy’s home almost a century ago. In Ghost for Rent, Steve’s skeleton was found in Wendy’s attic although he never haunted the house.  Wendy was left wondering why.  Now, in Ghost for Lunch, the answer is revealed.

Those both sound interesting. I can't wait to hear that they've released. Be sure to let us know when they do.
 
Penny Lockwood Ehrenkranz has published more than 100 articles, 75 stories, a chapbook, and her stories have been included in two anthologies. She writes for both adults and children. Her fiction has appeared in numerous genre and children’s publications, and non‑fiction work has appeared in a variety of writing, parenting, and young adult print magazines and on line publications.  She is a former editor for MuseItUp Publishing and Damnation Books.  Visit her web site at http:// pennylockwoodehrenkranz.yolasite.com. Her writing blog is located at http://pennylockwoodehrenkranz.blogspot.com/.
 
She has three romances published by MuseItUp Publishing: Love Delivery, Lady in Waiting, and Mirror, Mirror. She recently released Boo’s Bad Day with 4RV Publishing and has three other children’s books under contract with them: Ghost for Rent, Ghost for Lunch, and Many Colored Coats.  Her short story collection, A Past and A Future, is available through Alban Lake Publishing and Smashwords.
 
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