Saturday, July 23, 2016

An Interview of a Character in Penny Ehrenkranz's New Book

Welcome, fellow "ghost" writer, Penny Ehrenkranz to Writing with God's Hope blog. However, today, I won't be interviewing Penny. We wish to talk with the main character in her new book, Wendy Wiles.
                   

 

Wendy, tell us a little about yourself and your family.

 

I was born in Portland, Oregon in 1983.  When I was eleven, my mom and dad separated for a while and we had to move to a small town thirty miles outside Portland.  I was bummed since I had to leave all my friends behind.

 

My dad stayed in Portland, so my older brother Mike and I lived with our Mom.  Mom’s a writer, but she wasn’t selling too much.  My brother is a pain. He teases me a lot, but we eventually become close. My mom likes to say, “Wendy, darling,” when she talks to me and that drives me crazy.  I’m not some Peter Pan character.

 

I like to write and read poetry, so that makes me a little weird I guess.

 

What was it like moving from a big city to a rural community?  Was it hard to make new friends?

 

I hated moving at first, but because I met Jennifer, it wasn’t long before I felt good about it.  Mom used say in the city Mike and I were little fish in a big pond, but in Scappoose we were big fish in a little pond.  We were able to play sports and do things we might not have been able to do in the city where there were lots of kids wanting to do those things.  Jennifer had a lot of friends and she introduced me to them, but she and I were best friends.

 

What is your new hometown and school like?

 

Scappoose is where I go to school. I actually live in Warren, which isn’t really a town. Scappoose only has about 6,500 people.  There aren’t very many stores and the library is so tiny, not like the one in Portland.  St. Helens is the next town over. It’s the county seat and has over 12,000 people, and it has a few more places to shop, so Mom goes there more often to get stuff for us. 

 

Our school is small, too.  There are only four classes for each grade. Jennifer is a grade behind me in school, but we still see each other at lunch and recess times.  Mike goes to the middle school, which is right next door to Petersen School where I go.  It’s different from Portland, but I like it. The teachers are really nice.

 

When did you first realize your home was haunted?

 

The day we moved in and I met Jennifer, she told us a story about her brother and some friends spending the night in our house when it was empty. She said they heard a piano playing but no one was there.  While she was telling us the story, a windstorm blew through the porch where we were hiding from the rain.  All of a sudden the leaves looked like two people dancing and we heard this weird music.   Then later in the house, I started seeing things.  Crazy, huh?

 

What did you think when you learned your friend’s family restaurant was also haunted?

 

This was much later after we figured out what was going on at our house.  Jennifer and her family moved to California, and Mike and I met the new folks who moved in down the road from us.  They have a son, Jon. His family had read about our ghost hunting, and his mom was really interested.  She’s the one who told me they heard the building they bought for their new restaurant was also haunted.  It freaked me out at first because I was pretty well done with ghosts by this time. Once we started helping out getting the restaurant ready to open, Mike, Jon, and I all got curious and started digging for clues to see what was going on.

 

Were you scared when you found out you could see and communicate with ghosts?

 

You bet I was!  I’d get goose bumps whenever they came around or I saw them.  I didn’t know what to expect. I eventually figured out they wouldn’t hurt me, but they still scared me when they’d show up. They just wanted someone to know what had happened to them and why they died.

 

How did you and your friends solve the mystery of the ghosts?

 

We actually had a lot of help from the ghosts themselves.  We used the library to look up stuff and followed clues the ghosts left for us.

 

What do you like to do when you’re not chasing ghosts?

 

I love to read and write poetry.  I even had one of my poems published in a magazine.  Even though my brother teases me, we play together and with our friends.  We like being outside.  There’s always something to do when you live in the country, like riding our bikes and swimming.

 

Wendy, thanks for stopping by to visit with us.

 

Now, Penny, you tell us your point of view about Wendy's story.

   
Wendy Wiles attracts ghosts, first in Ghost for Rent, when her parents separate and she, her brother, and mother move into a haunted house. The story begins in Portland, Oregon and quickly moves to small town, Scappoose, Oregon. Miserable at leaving her friends and beloved Portland behind, Wendy meets her neighbor Jennifer who tells her the house Wendy’s mom rented is haunted. After two of them appear to Wendy, the girls find themselves tracking down the mystery of who the ghosts are and why they "live" in the Wiles' home.
 
In Ghost for Lunch, Wendy’s friend, Jennifer, moves away, leaving Wendy sad until new neighbors and their restaurant in St. Helens bring ghosts back into Wendy's life. She, her brother, and their new friend discover the two cases are connected. Once again, the young sleuths use clues and lots of brainstorming to figure out who is haunting the restaurant.
 
While on the surface, these two stories appear to be about ghosts and the mystery of solving them, they are also about the importance of family and friends and working together to solve a problem.
 
        Ghostly Visions is available direct from the publisher 4RV Publishing LLC for $15.99 including shipping and handling: http://www.4rvpublishingcatalog.com/penny-lockwood.php.  It can also be ordered from your local bookstore with the following ISBN numbers: ISBN-10: 0982642326, ISBN-13: 978-0982642320, or through Amazon, https://www.amazon.com/Ghostly-Visions-Ghost-Rent-Lunch/dp/0982642326/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1465600196&sr=1-1&keywords=ghostly+visions.
 
Penny Lockwood (Ehrenkranz) has published over 100 articles, 75 stories, a chapbook, and her stories have been included in two anthologies. She writes for both adults and children. Her fiction has appeared in numerous genres and children’s publications, and non‑fiction work has appeared in a variety of writing, parenting, and young adult print magazines and on line publications.  She is a former editor for MuseItUp Publishing, 4RV Publishing, and Damnation Books.  Visit her web site at http:// pennylockwoodehrenkranz.yolasite.com and her writing blog at http://pennylockwoodehrenkranz.blogspot.com/.
 
4RV Publishing has joined her two middle grade novels (Ghost for Rent and Ghost for Lunch) as Ghostly Visions. She recently released Boo’s Bad Day with 4RV Publishing and has one other children’s picture book under contract with them: Many Colored Coats. She has three romances published by MuseItUp Publishing: Love Delivery, Lady in Waiting, and Mirror, Mirror. Her short story collection, A Past and A Future, is available through Alban Lake Publishing and Smashwords.
 
Oh, Penny, I'm so glad the two books are available for purchase now. They sound wonderful. I need to get mine.
 
Does anyone have questions for Penny or Wendy?
 
 


3 comments:

Penny Lockwood Ehrenkranz said...

Janet, thank you for hosting me. I apologize for not checking in sooner. I appreciate your support.

Janet K Brown said...

Thanks you, Penny. I loved your post. Hope it helps sell those wonderful ghost stories.

Penny Lockwood Ehrenkranz said...

Thanks, Janet. One can only hope.